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Jigsaw puzzles from Japan

Index to Artists

On this page: Best-selling artists - Traditional painters - Illustrators and fantasy - Photographers - About Japanese names

A list of all Japanese artists whose work features on our puzzles, including not only painters and illustrators, but also photographers (but excluding anime for now). If you are looking for other examples of the artist's work, try the link to search at Google for the name in Japanese.

Artists' names are written in various orders, but the family name is always underlined.

Please note that the enlarged signature illustration may be that on a different puzzle from the sample shown.

Best-selling artists

Morita Haruyo

sample puzzle
Signature

Haruyo: signature and seal

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

27 puzzles in stock - View all thumbnails - Haruyo feature page

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Ozuma Kaname

sample puzzle
Signature

Signed Kaname with full-name seal

The painter Ozuma Kaname was born in 1939, in Niigata. He studied traditional Japanese art, and his pictures are generally based on traditional themes.

Ozuma is his family name: he signs paintings with the single character of his given name only.

4 puzzles in stock - View all thumbnails - Kaname feature page

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Kagaya Yutaka

sample puzzle

Born in Saitama (just north of Tokyo) in 1968, Kagaya spent his childhood in wonderment of the stars in the sky, and never stopped painting them. He has had a successful career as an illustrator for astronomical books and magazines, and many of his works have been turned into jigsaw puzzles, among other products. Since 1996, he has worked exclusively in the digital medium, using a Macintosh. Perhaps that is why he does not appear to sign his pictures.

He goes by his family name; his given name appears to be Yutaka, but in English you will also find him called Joh Kagaya (Jô is the Chinese reading of his name).

4 puzzles in stock - View all thumbnails - Kagaya feature page

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Traditional

Zigen Tanabe

sample puzzle

The artist was born in Toyama in 1970, and specialises in showy images, in his own reinterpretation of traditional Japanese themes. In 2000 he started to exhibit in the USA and now lives in New York State.

Tanabe is his family name; he signs his paintings with his given name Zigen. Note that the usual Romanisation of this would be "Jigen", but it seems that Zigen is the artist's own preference.

3 puzzles in stock - View all thumbnails

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Katsushika Hokusai

sample puzzle

The artist Katsushika Hokusai is best known for his series of 36 views of Mount Fuji, in the bold and simple style of the Ukiyo-e (or "floating world") style. He changed his name several times, so this is only the best-known of his brush names; as is the tradition, Hokusai is his given name (a fact that has plainly confused at least one art reference book).

4 puzzles in stock - View all thumbnails

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Kuroiwa Toyotaka

sample puzzle
Signature

Toyotaka seal

The artist was born in Nagano in 1947, and specialises in Buddhist themes, with a distinctive whimsically warm style. (Kuroiwa is his family name - he signs his pictures with a stylised seal of his given name, Toyotaka.)

2 puzzles in stock - View all thumbnails - Kuroiwa feature page

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Sekiguchi Inoichirô

sample puzzle
Signature

Ino seal

No details of this artist are readily available. He signs his paintings with a seal for the first character ('Ino') of his given name only: this means 'wild boar', which might seem surprising, but it is a fairly common element in names.

3 puzzles in stock - View all thumbnails

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Ogasawara Etsuko

sample puzzle

Few biographical details are available, but Ogasawara has worked as a background artist for anime production, and specialises in animal portraits.

Recent works by this artist all bear the unexplained copyright declaration "Row. V. Ogasawara." Perhaps "Row" is a nickname, but the initial is a mystery, and on earlier puzzles "Row. E. Ogasawara" has also been seen.

One puzzle in stock - View details - Ogasawara feature page

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Takeuchi Hakuga

sample puzzle

The artist was born in 1948, in Niigata. After working for a textile company, he went independent as a textile designer. He has his own individual drawing style, bringing a fresh approach to many traditional art themes.

He goes by his given name, Hakuga, in the traditional way, signing his paintings in a stylised, but non-cursive form.

2 puzzles in stock - View all thumbnails

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Harai Kayomi

sample puzzle

No biographical details available. She signs her given name Kayomi in Roman letters.

18 puzzles in stock - View all thumbnails - Kayomi feature page

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Mori Seikaku

sample puzzle

No biographical details, but the artist Mori Seikaku specialises in animal and flower scroll paintings. He signs his work the traditional way, with the characters for his given (brush) name, Seikaku (lit. 'nest of the crane') and a seal of the same.

5 puzzles in stock - View all thumbnails

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Kitagawa Utamaro

sample puzzle

Born around 1753, Utamaro was one of the most successful woodblock artists in his own time, specialising in sensuous portraits of women.

No puzzles currently in print

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Utagawa Hiroshige

sample puzzle

Hiroshige (1797 – 1858) was inspired by seeing the landscape images of Hokusai, to whom he became a younger rival. He joined the flourishing Utagawa school, and produced thousands of woodblock prints, using the most advanced techniques of the time. He is most famous for his series "The 53 stations of the Tokaido."

He is usually known as Utagawa Hiroshige, being his brush name within the school, but he was born into a low-ranking samurai family (with the job of fireman), and so is also sometimes known by his real family name, Ando.

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Shingo Saotome

Shingo Saotome is a self-taught artist, who loves to paint the natural world in acrylics. He has been active both in Japan and in Florida since 1993.

No puzzles currently in printNo puzzles found!

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Yoda Sasuga

sample puzzle

Few biographical details are available, but the artist fell in love with traditional Japanese painting at Tama Art University, and has been specialising in the birds-and-flowers and similar traditional themes ever since.

He signs and seals with his brush name Sasuga, which is written with the characters 'Flowing stone'.

One puzzle in stock - View details

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Ryutei

sample puzzle

Ryutei is almost certainly a brushname, but absolutely no other details of the artist are available...

One puzzle in stock - View details

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Kayama Ryokusui

sample puzzle

Very little biographical information to be found on the artist Kayama Ryokusui, who specialises in traditional Japanese styles, particularly of kakemono scrolls. Kayama is an ordinary family name, but Ryokusui is almost certainly a "brush name", consisting of two characters which both mean "green".

One puzzle in stock - View details

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Ukai Yuhei

sample puzzle

No biographical information is to be found on the artist Ukai Yuhei, another of the craft producers of traditional images particularly for kakemono scrolls. He signs his work the traditional way, with his given name Yuhei, and a seal of the same.

One puzzle in stock - View details

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Omori Shuka

sample puzzle

No biographical details for the artist Omori Shuka (properly Ōmori Shūka), a traditional craft-artist who signs his work with his brush-name Shuka and a seal of the same.

One puzzle in stock - View details

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Yamaguchi Senka

No biographical information, but the artist Yamaguchi Senka is another of the craft producers of traditional images particularly for kakemono scrolls. He signs his work the traditional way, with his given name Senka, and a seal of the same.

No puzzles currently in printNo puzzles found!

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Masawo Koga

sample puzzle

Born in Fukuoka in 1957, the artist Masawo Koga started out as a freelance illustrator in 1988. He produces book jackets, posters, game packaging and other work, specialising in realistic portrayals of nature, yet his images have a touch of fantasy to them.

He signs his work with his family name Koga in stylised capital letters.

One puzzle in stock - View details

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Jun Sato

sample puzzle

Born in Osaka in 1970, Jun Sato specialises in portraying the animal world, in a lively style, but one inspired by traditional Japanese paintings.

2 puzzles in stock - View all thumbnails

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Ishikawa Mari

sample puzzle

Born in 1968, Ishikawa Mari is a successful commercial illustrator. Fond of traditional Japanese styles, she produces work with a combination of calligraphy and art in a very jolly manner. Ishikawa is her family name.

2 puzzles in stock - View all thumbnails

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Mashima Tōkō

sample puzzle

This traditional artist's full name seems to be Mashima Tōkō (真島東紅), and he signs paintings with his given name Tōkō, which is surely a brush name, meaning "East crimson". No other biographical details can be found.

One puzzle in stock - View details

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Toyama Hiroko

sample puzzle

Born in Miyagi, northern Japan in 1984, Toyama Hiroko (Toyama is her family name) specialises in birds and flowers, bringing a modern touch along with many traditional stylisations. Toyama is her family name.

One puzzle in stock - View details

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Illustration

Shinya Uchida

sample puzzle

Uchida was born in 1960 in Kyushu, and after a degree in fine arts from Aichi University of Education, became hooked on lone travelling. From there he was drawn into sketching, getting his first magazine publication in 1988. Since then he has kept travelling the world, and produced a whole series of book publications. Having spent three years in Perth, from 1991 to 1994, he regards Australia as his second home, but has also visited many parts of Europe and America.

Note that he writes his name in the "Western" order; Uchida is his family name.

One puzzle in stock - View details - Uchida feature page

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Izumi Kazumi

sample puzzle

Izumi Kazumi is an animal artist who graduated from Osaka University fine arts department in 1984. Izumi is her family name.

6 puzzles in stock - View all thumbnails

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Hiroyuki Suwahara

sample puzzle

Born in Ibaraki, in 1969, Suwahara embarked on a career as a freelance illustrator in 1996. He has specialised in historical figures, especially from the Three Kingdoms story, and brings a very modern technique to some traditional themes.

Suwahara is his family name.

One puzzle in stock - View details - Suwahara feature page

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Hajime Okamoto

sample puzzle

Born in Osaka in 1942, Hajime Okamoto is an artist with a distinctive and very jolly style, who specialises in cats — particularly the beckoning bringers of good fortune. As part of a cultural exchange programme, in 1986 he spent time in Jilin, north-east China, studying seal-making and calligraphy.

He signs his paintings with a seal, and a stylised form of his name in Roman letters (with his family name last).

2 puzzles in stock - View all thumbnails - Okamoto feature page

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Tanaka Naoki

sample puzzle

Born in Tokyo in 1957, Tanaka graduated from Musashino Art University, and has achieved considerable success as an illustrator. His series of omnibus portrayals of famous sights has been widely adopted for use in jigsaw puzzles produced both in Japan and elsewhere: these are lively images, bending perspective at will to capture the essence of a location.

Naoki is his given name.

2 puzzles in stock - View all thumbnails - Tanaka feature page

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Shinji Yamamoto

sample puzzle

Born in Kyushu in 1980, Shinji Yamamoto graduated from the Nihon University College of Art, and immediately began a career as a commercial illustrator.

3 puzzles in stock - View all thumbnails - Yamamoto feature page

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Akiko Ikeda

sample puzzle

Born in Tokyo in 1950, Akiko Ikeda graduated from Aoyama Gakuin Women's Junior College in literature, and became a picture book author and artist. She is best known for creating the series of fantasy stories about the Wachifield cat Dayan and his friends.

One puzzle in stock - View details - Ikeda feature page

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Youseki Miki

sample puzzle

Born in Kyushu in 1966, Youseki Miki studied calligraphy, and after graduating from university embarked on a career as a commercial designer. He has developed a distinctive style of illustrated calligraphy with a contemporary, jovial touch. He writes his adopted brush name Youseki with nonstandard romanisation, to be read as the English word "you" plus "seki". (Miki is his family name, and his real name is Izuru.)

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Takashi Yamasaki

sample puzzle

Born in Osaka, Yamasaki attended Osaka University of Arts. After graduating in 1979 he worked for a technical illustration studio before becoming a freelance artist in 1984.

3 puzzles in stock - View all thumbnails

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Saito Shuichi

sample puzzle

Born in Miyagi (northern Japan) and now living in Tokyo, Saito has worked as a commercial designer and illustrator, specialising in the natural world. Properly his name is Romanised as Saitō Shūichi, and Saitō is his family name.

3 puzzles in stock - View all thumbnails

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Chihiro Iwasaki

sample puzzle

Born in Fukui Prefecture on the west coast of Japan in 1918, Chihiro Iwasaki showed an early aptitude for drawing. She later became well known for her illustrations, usually in a distinctive water colour style, of children and flowers. Although married twice, she continued to use her maiden family name of Iwasaki, which she usually wrote in hiragana (いわさき・ちひろ: I-wa-sa-ki Chi-hi-ro).

6 puzzles in stock - View all thumbnails - Chihiro feature page

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Fantasy

Fujishiro Seiji

sample puzzle

Born in 1924, Fujishiro has had a long and productive career as an illustrator - producing many children's books, and creating his own brand of fantasy along the way. From an early involvement with shadow puppetry, he developed his own unique style: he calls these kage-e (literally "shadow pictures"), but his is a backlit world not of black and white (or grey), but of wonderful translucent colours, apparently made mostly from tissue paper.

He is still active at the age of 80, and his work has appeared all over the world, most recently (February 2005) in New York and Washington.

18 puzzles in stock - View all thumbnails - Fujishiro feature page

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Shu Mizoguchi

sample puzzle

Born in Hiroshima in 1972, the artist developed his talent for original art while working as a graphic artist for a game company. He is now an independent creator of fantasy works.

Mizoguchi is his family name; he signs his work "Shu", the short form of his given name (Shuichi). On the box his name is given as "SHU Mizoguchi", somewhat confusingly, given the recent trend to writing the family name first capitalized.

51 puzzles in stock - View all thumbnails - Shu feature page

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Sasakura Teppei

sample puzzle

Born in Hyogo prefecture in 1954, Teppei earned a degree in commercial design from Musashino Art University, to begin a successful career as an illustrator. He has also had many exhibitions of his own work, in which European scenes in particular are prominent.

Sasakura is his family name - he signs his pictures "Teppei S."

12 puzzles in stock - View all thumbnails - Teppei feature page

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Kentaro Nishino

sample puzzle

Kentaro Nishino was born in 1980, in Kanazawa on the Japan Sea coast, and graduated from the Academy of Art University in San Francisco in 2003. He takes his inspiration from nature, while lending his own air of fantasy.

Nishino is his family name, but he signs his work "Kentaro N".

5 puzzles in stock - View all thumbnails - Nishino feature page

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Kazuha Fukami

sample puzzle

The artist Kazuha Fukami has produced a series of fantasy images of swirling figures, mostly women, some with swords, some not. According to her own website (http://kazuppo.net) she was born in Tokushima (on the island of Shikoku) in June of 198x, and likes polar bears, cows, natural minerals and more.

This is almost certainly a brush name: the family name Fukami means "deep-well", and Kazuha ("ten-thousand leaves") is an alternative reading of the name attached to the famous collection of ancient Japanese poems, Man'yōshū.

8 puzzles in stock - View all thumbnails

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Yuu

sample puzzle

The young artist Yuu comes from Gunma Prefecture; she now lives in Tokyo, having graduated from Tama Art University with a degree in graphic design. No other details are readily forthcoming...

4 puzzles in stock - View all thumbnails

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Takaki

sample puzzle

Born in Hokkaido in 1974, as a child the artist Takaki was fascinated by birds, so wings feature in many of her images. She became a protégée of Kagaya, and has produced many fantastic images.

17 puzzles in stock - View all thumbnails - Takaki feature page

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Kayo Horaguchi

sample puzzle

Born in Tokyo, Kayo Horaguchi started her career as a clothing designer, and gained experience in textile design and graphic design in the fashion business, until going freelance in 2006 as an illustrator and artist.

21 puzzles in stock - View all thumbnails - Horaguchi feature page

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Tsukiji Nao

sample puzzle

Nao Tsukiji (Nao is her family name) is a female manga artist, born in Fukuoka on March 11th. She does not reveal her age, but says that for as long as she can remember she has wanted to paint beautiful women.

One puzzle in stock - View details

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Song Qijin

sample puzzle

Song Qijin (宋其金) is a Chinese-born digital artist, affiliated with the Kogado Studio (name in the original Chinese order, Song is the surname).

2 puzzles in stock - View all thumbnails

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Kei

sample puzzle

The only biographical information is that the artist was born in Hokkaido in 1981, and produces a range of artwork in the fantasy genre.

3 puzzles in stock - View all thumbnails

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Photographers

Mizuno Katsuhiko

sample puzzle

Born in Kyoto in 1941, Mizuno Katsuhiko earned a degree in literature from Doshisha University in 1964. Since 1969 he has worked as a freelance photographer, in a lifelong quest to capture the essence of Japanese tradition in his native city, and resulting in publication of some one hundred books of his photographs.

3 puzzles in stock - View all thumbnails - Mizuno feature page

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About Japanese names

All modern Japanese names have two elements: a family name, followed by a given (or "personal") name. Almost all family names are written in Chinese characters (typically two characters), and so are the majority of given names. Historical names can be a bit more complicated, but invariably the pattern is "Big-endian", that is, the family name comes first, and the order goes from more general to more specific.

It has always seemed to me that a person's name is, well, their name, what they are called. So the obvious thing to do is simply to write down the name (as closely as possible) in Roman letters. This means that the family name comes first, which is not the usual way in English-speaking countries, but at least we can all say the name roughly the same. This is the usual practice with Chinese names, for example, so we have Mao Zedong and Chiang Kai-Shek, who are Mr Mao and Mr Chiang. And then, surname-first is sometimes distinctly preferable, as in telephone directories. Nonetheless, things are not really as clear-cut as this: in many parts of Europe, name order is much more fluid, and while names in Hungarian are written family name first (Bartok Bela, Liszt Ferenc), in neighbouring German-speaking areas the same names have generally been reversed, as in Franz Liszt (who, I believe, couln't even speak Hungarian).

So it seems that basically Japanese children learn at school that they should write their names family-name-last when in Roman letters. There has never been much consistency about this, though, and scholarly writing much more commonly preserves the original order; more recently the pendulum has swung back towards not reversing the name order for general use. Expect more confusion!

Artists' names

The tradition (as in the artistic world in general in Japan) is to use a "brush name", and this makes it even harder than usual to guess which is the (adopted) 'family' name if you don't know which order you are looking at. But there is another special difficulty with artists - whereas in everyday life in Japan people are known by their family names, artists usually go by their given names. So Hokusai is known by his (adopted) personal name Hokusai, and his (original) full name is Katsushika Hokusai, where Katsushika is not an original surname, but where he was born (now part of Tokyo). The trouble is that websites, art books, and other references sometimes call him "Katsushika Hokusai", sometimes "Hokusai Katsushika" (presumably because everyone knows Japanese names are written backwards). Then we find "Hokusai, Katsushika" which strongly implies that Hokusai is a family name - the end result is just more confusion.

What to do about it?

Where artists have become known by the 'backwards' family-name-last form, I've used it. Otherwise, I have generally kept the original form. But so that we know where we are, I have underlined the family name.

As usual, Wikipedia has a good general article on Japanese names.

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