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Jigsaw puzzles from Japan

The Attic

Deleted puzzles by artist Morita Haruyo

This page shows puzzles that are no longer available, just for historical curiosity, and for completeness.

In some cases puzzles are reissued with a different code number: if you have the old code number from somewhere, this page should show you the replacement (which may still be available).

2016 pieces

Evening mist
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Evening mist (Haruyo)

A courtesan, with front-tied obi and sumptuous purple kimono, strikes a dramatic pose - her camellia-patterned fan above her head as though to beckon the misty moon.

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

* This puzzle has smaller pieces than the standard size.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 2016 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E23301 (23-301 on box)
Retail price ¥3600

More puzzles like this one

Dance of the butterflies
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Dance of the butterflies (Haruyo)

In this simple yet elegant design, the young figure (a geisha?) surrounded by fluttering butterflies seems to muse "Should I be dancing too...?"

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

* This puzzle has smaller pieces than the standard size.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 2016 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E23304 (23-304 on box)
Retail price ¥3600

More puzzles like this one

Crane
© Haruyo

Crane (Haruyo)

The crane is a traditional auspicious symbol of happiness and longevity, and here Haruyo combines the cranes decorating the kimono with another pair flying through the sky...

This puzzle forms a pair with the Turtle (E23307): you can combine the two for a giant 4000-piece puzzle!

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

* This puzzle has smaller pieces than the standard size.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 2016 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E23306 (23-306 on box)
Retail price ¥3600

More puzzles like this one

Turtle
© Haruyo

Turtle (Haruyo)

The turtle is an ancient symbol of long life and good fortune, often appearing (as here on the kimono) together with a treasure ship. It is said that if a crane lives to be 1000, a turtle lives to be 10,000.

This is a picture in Haruyo's lush style, with plenty of background features, from Mount Fuji to the cherry blossom, which will keep the puzzle interesting.

This puzzle forms a pair with the Crane (E23306): you can combine the two for a giant 4000-piece puzzle!

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

* This puzzle has smaller pieces than the standard size.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 2016 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E23307 (23-307 on box)
Retail price ¥3600

More puzzles like this one

Dragon flower
© Haruyo

Dragon flower (Haruyo)

A classic Haruyo pose of this courtesan(?) in a richly coloured kimono. The outermost layer is decorated with a gorgeous (but as usual ferocious-looking) dragon...

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

* This puzzle has smaller pieces than the standard size.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 2016 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E23311 (23-311 on box)
Retail price ¥3600

More puzzles like this one

2000 pieces

Moonlight
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Moonlight (Haruyo)

Another sumptuously clad, but demure beauty - Haruyo has lost no opportunity to show us as many layers as possible.

Original title: Tsukiakari

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 2000 pieces; 73 x 102 cm (29" x 40")
Code: E20104 (20-104 on box)
Retail price ¥4800

More puzzles like this one

Evening
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Evening (Haruyo)

The wearer of this luxurious kimono - with a crane motif - has the obi (sash) tied at the front, a sign that she is a courtesan. Under thin moonlight filtering through the cherry blossoms, she has playfully wrapped the long sleeves around her hands.

Original title: Yoi

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 2000 pieces; 73 x 102 cm (29" x 40")
Code: E20109 (20-109 on box)
Retail price ¥4800

More puzzles like this one

Scarlet
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Scarlet (Haruyo)

A classic geisha pose - the model playfully shows off the ornate furisode sleeves of her kimono, against the background of a sumptuous red peony design. The original title, hien, is a rather fanciful word that might be translated "voluptuous scarlet."

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 2000 pieces; 73 x 102 cm (29" x 40")
Code: E20113 (20-113 on box)
Retail price ¥4800

More puzzles like this one

1900 pieces

Song of the moon
© Haruyo

Song of the moon (Haruyo)

A classic Haruyo pose, of a dancer with a ceremonial rope (Shimenawa). The kimono layers show a brilliant range of colour, while the background is subdued yet not plain, for there is cherry blossom, daisies, and a distant pagoda.

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

* Combination of 1500 + 400 small-piece puzzles

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1900 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E17103 (17-103 on box)
Retail price ¥3900

More puzzles like this one

1518 pieces

Wisteria beauty
© Haruyo

Wisteria beauty (Haruyo)

Against a subdued background, Haruyo portrays a figure in a luxuriant kimono decorated with flower and bird motifs in rich colours. The wisteria of the title hangs over her — the plant is native to Japan, and is called fuji (no particular connection with the mountain name).

This puzzle can be combined with the Lily puzzle (code E18018) to make a 3000+ piece panel.

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

* This puzzle has smaller pieces than the standard size.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1518 pieces; 34 x 102 cm (13" x 40")
Code: E18017 (18-017 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

1500 pieces

Dance of the heron
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Spirit of the heron (Haruyo)

This dance is a classic kabuki number, entitled sagi-musume or the Heron-girl, in which the single dancer portrays the agony of love, through all its phases. By folding or unfolding parts of her costume, she can completely change her appearance. This is another chance for Haruyo to show us richly varied kimono layers, which she has set against a luxuriant purple backdrop.

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

* This puzzle has smaller pieces than the standard size.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1500 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E15029 (15-029 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Agemaki
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Agemaki (Haruyo)

Agemaki is the courtesan in the classic kabuki play Sukeroku yukari no Edo zakura, a story of her suicide pact with her lover Sukeroku. Here Haruyo portrays her in gorgeous pose on her ornate multi-layered kimono.

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

* This puzzle has smaller pieces than the standard size.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1500 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E15032 (15-032 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Hanako (from Musume Dojoji)
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Hanako (from Musume Dojoji) (Haruyo)

Hanako is the principal character of this, the Kabuki version of the Dojoji story. Here Haruyo shows a dance early in the story (before she begins to turn into a snake!) where her accessories are brightly coloured sunshades. These are not umbrellas in form, rather the type of wide headgear used for sun protection and tied under the chin.

Kabuki summary

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

* This puzzle has smaller pieces than the standard size.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1500 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E15042 (15-042 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Suiga
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Suiga (Haruyo)

A geisha dances a scene from the classic kabuki play of old Tokyo O-matsuri ("festival", referring to one of the three great Tokyo festivals). The title, Suiga is perhaps a fanciful name for the dancer, evoking grace and purity...

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

* This puzzle has smaller pieces than the standard size.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1500 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E15049 (15-049 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

1014 pieces

Evening mist
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Evening mist (Haruyo)

A courtesan, with front-tied obi and sumptuous purple kimono, strikes a dramatic pose - her camellia-patterned fan above her head as though to beckon the misty moon.

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

* This puzzle has smaller pieces than the standard size.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1014 pieces; 38 x 53 cm (15" x 21")
Code: E56005 (56-005 on box)
Retail price ¥2000

More puzzles like this one

1000 pieces

Adesugata
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Adesugata (Haruyo)

I first translated the title, Adesugata, as "allure" - feeling I ought to be polite, but a bit puzzled since this actually means something like "sexy pose". I really couldn't see why, until it was pointed out to me that the figure is a courtesan (since she has the bow tied at the front), and moreover she is besporting herself in her undies! The black kimono hanging in the background is her overgarment, and we are seeing the next layer down. (I think it's just Haruyo's excuse to paint more kimonos...)

Note that this puzzle also appears on the back of some boxes, but with an older product code: 1000-609.

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 75 x 50 cm (30" x 20")
Code: E11012 (11-012 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Shishinomai
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Shishinomai (Haruyo)

The "Lion dance" - strictly though, this kimono is decorated with a Shishi, the mythical beast that reached Japan from China and Korea.

Detail

More about the shishi in Mark Schumacher's Buddhist Corner
And my photographs

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E11013 (11-013 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Dôjôji
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Dôjôji (Haruyo)

This is a portrayal of the dancing girl of Dôjôji, a temple in Western Japan. This very traditional story has origins in Noh theatre, but also exists in a more recent Kabuki version. In a nutshell, she captivates the priests with her dancing.

We see Haruyo's character dancing with a fan, though her expression (and the ornate costume) suggests the dance is rather sedate. The background is reminiscent of traditional Japanese theatre scenery, with its highly stylised pine trees and cherry blossoms.

Detail

Synopsis of the kabuki version - for more sites, try Google, and search for "Musume Dojoji".

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E11035 (11-035 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Floral
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Floral (Haruyo)

A somewhat pensive lady displays this sumptuously florid kimono. The background gives a semi-abstract impression of clouds and plants, simultaneously reflecting the artist's enthusiasm for textile design.

Original title: Shôka ("Syoka" on the box)

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E11041 (11-041 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Futarimai
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Two ladies (Haruyo)

The original title, Futarimai, literally means "a dance of two people" and the two figures are posed as if in a swirl of fallen cherry blossom.

Remember (see detail below) that traditionally the feature of a kimono regarded as sexiest was the revealed back of the neck.

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E11053 (11-053 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Lovelorn
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Lovelorn (Haruyo)

The young beauty looks wistfully from the bridge - Haruyo sets her off against a background of camellias and the clump of chrysanthemums in the foreground.

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E11064 (11-064 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Flower thoughts
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Flower thoughts (Haruyo)

"Flower thoughts" indeed! Haruyo has gone almost over the top here: the subject has an almost quizzical expression, as if to say "Me? Overdressed?" In addition to her elaborate obi and headwear, petals from the cherry tree flutter down all over her, leaving absolutely no blank areas in this puzzle!

Original title: Kasou

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E11071 (11-071 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Haruka
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc
haru
spring
ka
perfume

Haruka (Haruyo)

Spring! The youthful Haruka, in her bright pink kimono, holds a spray of forsythia and irises. Perhaps the drape in the background is ready for some celebrations under the cherry blossoms?

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E11083 (11-083 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Evening
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Evening (Haruyo)

The wearer of this luxurious kimono - with a crane motif - has the obi (sash) tied at the front, a sign that she is a courtesan. Under thin moonlight filtering through the cherry blossoms, she has playfully wrapped the long sleeves around her hands.

Original title: Yoi

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E11087 (11-087 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Moonlight
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Moonlight (Haruyo)

Another sumptuously clad, but demure beauty - Haruyo has lost no opportunity to show us as many layers as possible.

Original title: Tsukiakari

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E11088 (11-088 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Ayaka
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc
aya
tints
ka
summer

Ayaka (Haruyo)

Midsummer night! To a background of fireworks, the young Ayaka stands among summer flowers.

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E11092 (11-092 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Chiaki
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc
chi
thousand
aki
autumn

Chiaki (Haruyo)

A thousand autumns! Chiaki has a slightly quizzical look as she stands gracefully in her kimono, surrounded by brilliant red maples.

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E11096 (11-096 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Fuyune
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc
fuyu
winter
ne
sound

Fuyune (Haruyo)

Winter! Fuyune holds her new year's "arrow of good fortune", surrounded by peonies, pine and red-berried nanten bushes weighed down by snow dumplings. Haruyo has thoughtfully added a distant golden pavilion (Kinkakuji) to break up what would otherwise be a large blank area in the upper right corner.

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E11098 (11-098 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

The garden of the four seasons
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

The garden of the four seasons (Haruyo)

Here we see the four ladies, representing the seasons, gathered together in a lawn party somehow reminiscent of a scene from the French impressionists. One dances with a fan, another accompanying her on the koto; a third reads, while the fourth is content to watch.

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 75 x 50 cm (30" x 20")
Code: E11121 (11-121 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Violet
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Violet (Haruyo)

A delicate young model holds a gauzy purple veil, and just reveals on her sleeve an echo of Hokusai's "Wave."

Original title: Shiyu

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E11128 (11-128 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Cherry
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Cherry (Haruyo)

A young girl, her kimono decorated with delicate pink origami cranes, shelters under her diaphanous umbrella - the wind gusts a shower of cherry blossom petals. Haruyo has completed the scene with Mt. Fuji in the distance.

Original title: Yumezakura, literally "dream cherry"

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E11147 (11-147 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Verdant
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Verdant (Haruyo)

The wearer of this palest of green kimonos looks wistful. (Why does she bite her veil, I wonder?) The original title Ryokufû does not translate easily: literally it is "green wind", but "summer breezes" might be closer to the image Haruyo is evoking.

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E11151 (11-151 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Azure
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Azure (Haruyo)

With the sea as backdrop, the model holds a posy of assorted summer flowers, while her elegant but simple kimono is set off perfectly by the obi decorated with a pair of crested ibises. (Though the birds have a somewhat unusual bluish tinge.)

Original title: Seisui ("blue purity")

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E11152 (11-152 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Lustrous white
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Lustrous white (Haruyo)

This young bride has a modest enough pose, but her wedding kimono is luxuriant - diaphanous, a tinge of pale green, with a pattern of white cranes. Over the plum blossoms in the background, a pair of golden cranes bring good fortune.

Original title: Kihaku

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E11164 (11-164 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Scarlet
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Scarlet (Haruyo)

A classic geisha pose - the model playfully shows off the ornate furisode sleeves of her kimono, against the background of a sumptuous red peony design. The original title, hien, is a rather fanciful word that might be translated "voluptuous scarlet."

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E11173 (11-173 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Orchid
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Orchid (Haruyo)

More precisely Phalaenopsis or the moth orchid - the young lady in this picture is surrounded by these exquisite and exotic blooms. It is difficult for the Web version to do justice to the delicate beauty of this image.

The original title, Kochouran is literally "moth orchid". (Incidentally, these are said to be relatively easy orchids to grow yourself!)

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E11174 (11-174 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Rose
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Rose (Haruyo)

The rose - symbol of love and pain; Haruyo has drawn this beguiling figure surrounded by red roses, and has written a subtitle by her signature. Atsuki-omoi-wo - "with passion"...

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E11180 (11-180 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Chrysanthemum
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Chrysanthemum (Haruyo)

By her signature and seal, Haruyo has written "With noble heart..." - a fitting phrase, remembering that the chrysanthemum is the symbol of the Japanese Imperial crown.

The courtesan wears a kimono of deep blue and gold, with an obi of purple, decorated with peacock feathers.

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E11181 (11-181 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Peony
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Peony (Haruyo)

Holding a peony in her hand, the young figure in this picture (the hairstyle shows her to be a princess) is surrounded by a veritable forest of blooms. Haruyo stresses the innocence of her pose with the subtitle "Shyly..." (by the signature).

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E11190 (11-190 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Iris
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Iris (Haruyo)

The figure standing amidst this luxuriant bed of irises wears a rich red kimono with the black hem that marks her as a daughter of the merchant class.

Haruyo has again added an inscription by her signature - "Treasuring you..."

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E11195 (11-195 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Yellow splendour
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Yellow splendour (Haruyo)

The original title, Ouka, combines the charcter for "yellow" with that for "lustrous", in a way it is difficult to capture in English! The subject wears a kimono richly patterned in reds and purple, and stands on a background of fanciful flowers, in a setting of the richest deepest yellow...

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

* This puzzle is cut to make pieces harder to find.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E11307 (11-307 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Dance of celebration
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Dance of celebration (Haruyo)

There are many famous traditional Japanese dances of celebration, which Haruyo represents figuratively here. The dancer adopts a striking pose, with fan held low, to show off her flamboyant kimono. This is decorated with cranes and red bamboo, auspicious emblems to set off the rich red background Mount Fuji...

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E11329 (11-329 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Charcoal
© Haruyo

Charcoal (Haruyo)

Haruyo has succeeded with a difficult artistic challenge—to make "black" into an alluring theme. This courtesan wears a kimono of vivid orange and purple, well set off against the black background with its lacework of red peonies. In her right hand she holds a kiseru, the traditional style of tobacco pipe, and her bare right foot peeps enticingly from the hem of her kimono.

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

* This puzzle is cut to make pieces harder to find.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E11338 (11-338 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Soju
© Haruyo

Soju (Haruyo)

Two women, in elegant and contrasting kimonos, express a bond of trust and mutual reliance. The title is near untranslatable: the first character (properly ) means "double" or "twin", the second (ju) "long life" or "congratulations".

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E11345 (11-345 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Moon and rabbit
© Haruyo

Moon and rabbit (Haruyo)

A classic Haruyo design: a vividly decorated kimono, against a subdued, but patterned, background.

The original title Tsuki-usagi simply concatenates the words for "moon" and "rabbit", and these are the most prominent emblems in the design. The connection may not be obvious, but in Japanese tradition, in place of a Man in the Moon, there is said to be a rabbit, beating glutinous rice...

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E11362 (11-362 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Yuiju
© Haruyo

Yuiju (Haruyo)

A bride, in an exceedingly ornate kimono decorated with flowers and cranes, while yet more cranes in the background promise good fortune.

The title, Yuiju, is practically untranslatable: Yui is the "Bonds" of the series title, and ju is the character also read kotobuki and used only in a formulaic way, to mean "Good fortune" or "Congratulations." Perhaps this amounts to something like "Bridal fortune."

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Not available
Discontinued November 2017
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E11416 (11-416 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Starflower
© Haruyo

Starflower (Haruyo)

A courtesan wears another of Haruyo's lavishly decorated kimonos, with a blue uchikake, or outer layer, providing space for more ornamentation with peacock feathers. The background lily pond merges into the starry sky above...

This puzzle forms a pair with Moonflower (E11430): you can combine the two for a full-size 2000-piece puzzle.

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
Discontinued June 2017
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E11429 (11-429 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Gold
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Gold (Haruyo)

The original title, Kogane Miyabi, says it all: "Golden elegance." The young model is ornately dressed in a silver and floral design kimono, but is still outdone by the backdrop - her outer robe of a golden peacock design.

Detail

This puzzle is printed on a special foil surface.

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

* This puzzle has a metallic foil finish.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E13235 (13-235 on box)
Retail price ¥3900

More puzzles like this one

Evening cherry
© Haruyo

Evening cherry (Haruyo)

A classic pose: a young woman sits gracefully in a vivid floral kimono, to a backdrop of cherry blossoms.

You will need to look out for the "mistakes" in the picture on the box, but this should be a fun puzzle, with plenty of texture and no tedious uniform areas.

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

* The picture on the box has a number of "mistakes", slight differences from the puzzle.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 75 x 50 cm (30" x 20")
Code: E59002 (59-002 on box)
Retail price ¥3900

More puzzles like this one

Kyoto dance
© Haruyo

Kyoto dance (Haruyo)

Three figures perform an elegant dance, with huge floral fronds (of wisteria?) — the original title is Kyo-no-mai.

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

* The picture on the box has a number of "mistakes", slight differences from the puzzle.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 75 x 50 cm (30" x 20")
Code: E59008 (59-008 on box)
Retail price ¥3900

More puzzles like this one

Firefly night
© Haruyo

Firefly night (Haruyo)

Fireflies (hotaru) are a classic symbol of summer. Here the figure, wearing a kimono elaborately decorated with rabbits and tropical fish, holds a lantern, perhaps to attract the fireflies, while in the shadowy background a traditional bridge and temple building can just be seen.

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

* The picture on the box has a number of "mistakes", slight differences from the puzzle.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E59010 (59-010 on box)
Retail price ¥3900

More puzzles like this one

Melancholy
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Melancholy (Haruyo)

The Tale of Genji (Genji monogatari) is said to be the world's first novel, written in around 1000 AD, by the Lady Murasaki Shikibu (978-1016). Haruyo has chosen vignettes from the story, to illustrate the opulent fashion of court life in the Heian era.

Yûshû - melancholy. This is Murasaki, Genji's longest, truest love, it seems, reduced to desolation when Genji marries the Third Princess. Why, in an era when it was quite normal to marry several people? Well, though Genji remained emotionally faithful to Murasaki, she was far outranked in the complicated social scale by his new wife, and fell ill, never to recover. Notice how her hair is almost as long as the elaborate kimono she wears; apparently long hair was the principal thing men of the time were attracted by.

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E83143 (1000SN-143 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Firefly
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Firefly (Haruyo)

The Tale of Genji (Genji monogatari) is said to be the world's first novel, written in around 1000 AD, by the Lady Murasaki Shikibu (978-1016). Haruyo has chosen vignettes from the story, to illustrate the opulent fashion of court life in the Heian era.

Koihotaru is the original title - simply "fireflies of love". In this episode of the story, Genji's foster daughter, Tamakazura, is having emotional problems with her suitors, and when visited at night by one of them, Prince Hotaru ("the Firefly Prince"), Genji helps things along by releasing a cloud of fireflies by whose glow her true beauty is revealed.

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 75 x 50 cm (30" x 20")
Code: E83144 (1000SN-144 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Charm
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Charm (Haruyo)

The Tale of Genji (Genji monogatari) is said to be the world's first novel, written in around 1000 AD, by the Lady Murasaki Shikibu (978-1016). Haruyo has chosen vignettes from the story, to illustrate the opulent fashion of court life in the Heian era.

The original title on the box is Yûen, a poetic term for grace and beauty. This lady is one of Genji's many lovers, but is also (unknown to Genji) the daughter of an enemy. Here she awaits a tryst in her many-layered kimono, under the hazy spring moon (oborozuki: another icon of Japanese literature).

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E83170 (1000SN-170 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Fujimusume
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Fujimusume (Haruyo)

Fujimusume is a traditional character from Japanese dance - her name comes from fuji, wisteria (nothing to do with Mt. Fuji) and musume, means "daughter" or simply "young woman". Typically she dances on a stage set with exuberantly stylised hanging blossom. The wide black hat is another standard accessory: perhaps Haruyo's character holds it in her hand to give us a better view of the decorations in her hair.

Detail

Kaname's version of Fujimusume (1000 pieces)

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E83171 (1000SN-171 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Sachi
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Sachi (Haruyo)

The title, Sachi, means "happiness" or "blessings". There is a simple, classical elegance to this portrait of a lady with two doves.

There's a bonus with this puzzle: on the back of the box appears the whole range of Haruyo puzzles as of around the year 2000 - unfortunately only a very few of these are still available.

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E83213 (1000SN-213F on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

Oborozuki
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Oborozuki (Haruyo)

The title is somewhat difficult to translate: "the (spring) moon, shrouded in haze," a common motif in both art and song. Haruyo has placed the moon right at the top right corner, and given her model a striking diagonal pose. (Incidentally leaving quite a large plain area for a puzzle!) Although the colours here are restrained, the courtesan holds her outer robe to give us a good view of the picture on it - a crane, over woods and waves.

Detail

There's a bonus with this puzzle: on the back of the box appears the whole range of Haruyo puzzles as of around the year 2000 - unfortunately only a very few of these are still available.

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 50 x 75 cm (20" x 30")
Code: E83214 (1000SN-214F on box)
Retail price ¥3000

More puzzles like this one

500 pieces

Futarimai
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Two ladies (Haruyo)

The original title, Futarimai, literally means "a dance of two people" and the two figures are posed as if in a swirl of fallen cherry blossom.

Remember that traditionally the feature of a kimono regarded as sexiest was the revealed back of the neck.

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 500 pieces; 38 x 53 cm (15" x 21")
Code: E06024 (06-024S on box)
Retail price ¥2000

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Floral
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Floral (Haruyo)

A somewhat pensive lady displays this sumptuously florid kimono. The background gives a semi-abstract impression of clouds and plants, simultaneously reflecting the artist's enthusiasm for textile design.

Original title: Shôka ("Syoka" on the box)

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 500 pieces; 38 x 53 cm (15" x 21")
Code: E06025 (06-025S on box)
Retail price ¥2000

More puzzles like this one

Violet
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Violet (Haruyo)

A delicate young model holds a gauzy purple veil, and just reveals on her sleeve an echo of Hokusai's "Wave."

Original title: Shiyu

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 500 pieces; 38 x 53 cm (15" x 21")
Code: E06032 (06-032S on box)
Retail price ¥2000

More puzzles like this one

450 pieces

Spirit of the heron
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Spirit of the heron (Haruyo)

This dance is a classic kabuki number, entitled sagi-musume or the Heron-girl, in which the single dancer portrays the agony of love, through all its phases. By folding or unfolding parts of her costume, she can completely change her appearance. This is another chance for Haruyo to show us richly varied kimono layers, which she has set against a luxuriant purple backdrop.

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

* This puzzle has smaller pieces than the standard size.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 450 pieces; 26 x 38 cm (10" x 15")
Code: E08010 (08-010 on box)
Retail price ¥1400

More puzzles like this one

Peony
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Peony (Haruyo)

Holding a peony in her hand, the young figure in this picture (the hairstyle shows her to be a princess) is surrounded by a veritable forest of blooms. Haruyo stresses the innocence of her pose with the subtitle "Shyly..." (by the signature).

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

* This puzzle has smaller pieces than the standard size.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 450 pieces; 26 x 38 cm (10" x 15")
Code: E08011 (08-011 on box)
Retail price ¥1400

More puzzles like this one

Gold
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Gold (Haruyo)

The original title, Kogane Miyabi, says it all: "Golden elegance." The young model is ornately dressed in a silver and floral design kimono, but is still outdone by the backdrop - her outer robe of a golden peacock design.

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

* This puzzle has smaller pieces than the standard size.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 450 pieces; 26 x 38 cm (10" x 15")
Code: E08012 (08-012 on box)
Retail price ¥1400

More puzzles like this one

Orchid
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Orchid (Haruyo)

More precisely Phalaenopsis or the moth orchid - the young lady in this picture is surrounded by these exquisite and exotic blooms. It is difficult for the Web version to do justice to the delicate beauty of this image.

The original title, Kochouran is literally "moth orchid". (Incidentally, these are said to be relatively easy orchids to grow yourself!)

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

* This puzzle has smaller pieces than the standard size.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 450 pieces; 26 x 38 cm (10" x 15")
Code: E08013 (08-013 on box)
Retail price ¥1400

More puzzles like this one

Double dance
© Haruyo

Double dance (Haruyo)

Two elegant dancer are posed as if in a swirl of fallen cherry blossom, and the standing figure reminds us that traditionally the feature of a kimono regarded as sexiest was the revealed back of the neck.

Original title: Futarimai (the earlier 1000-piece version we titled Two ladies)

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

* This puzzle has smaller pieces than the standard size.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 450 pieces; 26 x 38 cm (10" x 15")
Code: E08043 (08-043 on box)
Retail price ¥1400

More puzzles like this one

Scarlet
© Haruyo

Scarlet (Haruyo)

A classic geisha pose - the model playfully shows off the ornate furisode sleeves of her kimono, against the background of a sumptuous red peony design. The original title, hien, is a rather fanciful word that might be translated "voluptuous scarlet."

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

* This puzzle has smaller pieces than the standard size.

* The picture on the box has a number of "mistakes", slight differences from the puzzle.

Permanently unavailable
Discontinued January 2017
An Apollo puzzle: 450 pieces; 26 x 38 cm (10" x 15")
Code: P44504 (44-504 on box)
Retail price ¥1800

More puzzles like this one

Evening mist
© Haruyo

Evening mist (Haruyo)

A courtesan, with front-tied obi and sumptuous purple kimono, strikes a dramatic pose - her camellia-patterned fan above her head as though to beckon the misty moon.

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

* This puzzle has smaller pieces than the standard size.

* This puzzle has the same image printed on both sides.

Permanently unavailable
An Apollo puzzle: 450 pieces; 26 x 38 cm (10" x 15")
Code: P44710 (44-710 on box)
Retail price ¥2000

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420 pieces

Chrysanthemum moon
© Haruyo

Chrysanthemum moon (Haruyo)

This is a cropped version of the original "Chrysanthemum" in this series, portraying a courtesan in a kimono of deep blue and gold, with an obi of purple, decorated with peacock feathers. The original version includes a comment by Haruyo, "With noble heart..." — a fitting phrase, remembering that the chrysanthemum is the symbol of the Japanese Imperial crown.

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

* This puzzle has smaller pieces than the standard size.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 420 pieces; 18 x 52 cm (7" x 20")
Code: E52152 (52-152 on box)
Retail price ¥1800

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300 pieces

Sparkler
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Sparkler (Haruyo)

The Tale of Genji (Genji monogatari) is said to be the world's first novel, written in around 1000 AD, by the Lady Murasaki Shikibu (978-1016). Haruyo has chosen vignettes from the story, to illustrate the opulent fashion of court life in the Heian era.

The wearer of this kimono is holding a senkô hanabi, a firework that makes up for its lack of power with an exquisite delicacy. From the dangling, glowing blob, delicate sparks fly like filligree fronds.

The original title, Ryô, means simply "cool" - for anyone who comes from England as I do, it helps to remember that in Japan fireworks mean summer, since there are no long light evenings to get in the way.

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 300 pieces; 26 x 38 cm (10" x 15")
Code: E07429 (300N-429 on box)
Retail price ¥1800

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Dream of Genji
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Dream of Genji (Haruyo)

The Tale of Genji (Genji monogatari) is said to be the world's first novel, written in around 1000 AD, by the Lady Murasaki Shikibu (978-1016). Haruyo has chosen vignettes from the story, to illustrate the opulent fashion of court life in the Heian era.

Here we see the author herself, Murasaki Shikibu. As she ponders what to write, her hero Genji plays the flute, perhaps for a lover. Of course all this is an excuse for Haruyo's kimono imagination.

Original title: Yume-maboroshi (dream-visions)

Detail

From the Tale of Genji site: a statue of the author at her writing table

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 300 pieces; 26 x 38 cm (10" x 15")
Code: E27019 (27-019 on box)
Retail price ¥1500

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216 pieces

Scarlet
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Scarlet (Haruyo)

A classic geisha pose - the model playfully shows off the ornate furisode sleeves of her kimono, against the background of a sumptuous red peony design. The original title, hien, is a rather fanciful word that might be translated "voluptuous scarlet."

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

* This puzzle has smaller pieces than the standard size.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 216 pieces; 18 x 26 cm (7" x 10")
Code: E04001 (04-001 on box)
Retail price ¥1200

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Evening mist
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Evening mist (Haruyo)

A courtesan, with front-tied obi and sumptuous purple kimono, strikes a dramatic pose - her camellia-patterned fan above her head as though to beckon the misty moon.

Detail

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

* This puzzle has smaller pieces than the standard size.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 216 pieces; 18 x 26 cm (7" x 10")
Code: E04002 (04-002 on box)
Retail price ¥1200

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Chrysanthemum
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Chrysanthemum (Haruyo)

By her signature and seal, Haruyo has written "With noble heart..." - a fitting phrase, remembering that the chrysanthemum is the symbol of the Japanese Imperial crown.

The courtesan wears a kimono of deep blue and gold, with an obi of purple, decorated with peacock feathers.

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

* This puzzle has smaller pieces than the standard size.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 216 pieces; 18 x 26 cm (7" x 10")
Code: E04009 (04-009 on box)
Retail price ¥1200

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Violet
© Studio Morita / Studio Oz Inc

Violet (Haruyo)

A delicate young model holds a gauzy purple veil, and just reveals on her sleeve an echo of Hokusai's "Wave."

Original title: Shiyu

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

* This puzzle has smaller pieces than the standard size.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 216 pieces; 18 x 26 cm (7" x 10")
Code: E04013 (04-013 on box)
Retail price ¥1200

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Evening

Evening (Haruyo)

The wearer of this luxurious kimono - with a crane motif - has the obi (sash) tied at the front, a sign that she is a courtesan. Under thin moonlight filtering through the cherry blossoms, she has playfully wrapped the long sleeves around her hands.

Original title: Yoi

The artist Morita Haruyo studied both Japanese art and kimono design, and she combines these with elements of her own Western-influenced technique. (She travelled to London in 1977, exactly the year I [Brian Chandler] first came to Tokyo.)

Morita is her family name: she follows the tradition of signing - and sealing - paintings with her given name only.

* This puzzle has smaller pieces than the standard size.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 216 pieces; 18 x 26 cm (7" x 10")
Code: E04014 (04-014 on box)
Retail price ¥1200

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Substituted puzzle

E20090: this puzzle reissued as E20109 - Evening (2000pcs)

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