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Jigsaw puzzles from Japan

The Attic

Deleted puzzles

This page shows puzzles that are no longer available, just for historical curiosity, and for completeness.

In some cases puzzles are reissued with a different code number: if you have the old code number from somewhere, this page should show you the replacement (which may still be available).

1000 pieces

The treasure ship
© Tanimoto Ichirô

The treasure ship (Tanimoto)

The seven gods bring treasure, while showing off their distinct characters. The turtle and crane are the usual good luck figures, while some stylised pine trees and Mount Fuji complete the background.

Born in 1951 in Kyoto, the artist Tanimoto Ichiro studied Japanese art, and has worked as a designer. He has held a number of exhibitions of kimono patterns, and although he paints traditional themes, his style is one of bold and direct characterisation, more reminiscent of textile design than brushwork.

Permanently unavailable
An Appleone puzzle: 1000 pieces; 75 x 50 cm (30" x 20")
Code: A10432 (1000-432 on box)
Retail price ¥3600

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Four gods
© Tanabe Zigen

Four gods (Zigen)

An exhuberant interpretation of the Four Gods theme - Suzaku in particular is a dazzling crimson.

The artist was born in Toyama in 1970, and specialises in showy images, in his own reinterpretation of traditional Japanese themes.

Tanabe is his family name; he signs his paintings with his given name Zigen. Note that the usual Romanisation of this would be "Jigen", but it seems that Zigen may be the artist's own preference.

Detail

Detail shows the two heads of Genbu, the snake/turtle.

This is a "Glow-in-the-dark" puzzle.

* This is a glow-in-the-dark puzzle.

Permanently unavailable
A Beverly puzzle: 1000 pieces; 72 x 49 cm (28" x 19")
Code: B31331 (31-331 on box)
Retail price ¥3300

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Four gods in Kyoto
© Daruma Shoten
Position map

Four gods in Kyoto

A modern, even psychedelic, rendering of the four gods: blue dragon and white tiger, Genbu the entwined snake and turtle, and Suzaku the red phoenix. These four protectors of the compass points were an ancient import from China, and in the year 794, when the Emperor Kammu moved the capital from Nara to modern Kyoto, it is said that to help the four gods protect it he had the streets laid out on a NSEW grid, as we see here in the background. This started the great flowering of Japanese culture called the Heian Period (which is why the capital was then called Heian-kyo).

This image comes from a group of digital artists in Kyoto called Daruma Shoten. Website: http://dalma.jp

Permanently unavailable
A Beverly puzzle: 1000 pieces; 72 x 49 cm (28" x 19")
Code: B51101 (51-101 on box)
Retail price ¥2800

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Four gods of feng-shui
© Noda Sesson

Four gods of feng-shui (Sesson)

In this version, the four gods surround a rustic scene, in rather delicate forms: the tiger and dragon look fierce enough, but Suzaku the red phoenix provides a delightfully contrasting filigree.

ses-
snow
son
village

No biographical details available. Conventionally, artists are known by their "given names", though the 'son' character in particular clearly indicates this as a "brush name."

Permanently unavailable
A Beverly puzzle: 1000 pieces; 72 x 49 cm (28" x 19")
Code: B61155 (61-155 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

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Treasure boat
© Youseki Miki

Treasure boat (Youseki)

The usual seven gods aboard their treasure boat, but with many distinctive Youseki touches: three prominent Jizō statues, for a start. The banner is inscribed 開運招福 (kaiun-shōfuku), which translates roughly as "May fortune smile upon you!"

Born in Kyushu in 1966, Youseki Miki studied calligraphy, and after graduating from university embarked on a career as a commercial designer. He has developed a distinctive style of illustrated calligraphy with a contemporary, jovial touch. He writes his adopted brush name Youseki with nonstandard romanisation, to be read as the English word "you" plus "seki". (Miki is his family name, and his real name is Izuru.)

Permanently unavailable
Discontinued June 2017
A Beverly puzzle: 1000 pieces; 49 x 72 cm (19" x 28")
Code: B61377 (61-377 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

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Seven gods arrive with treasure
© Mori Seikaku

Seven gods arrive with treasure (Seikaku)

The seven gods bringing home their treasure ship, conveying wealth and good fortune to us all. They have a jolly demeanour, and their ornately decorated vessel carries the usual chests of gold coin, and also the prized red coral. There are no blank areas in the surroundings, which present more auspicious symbols: cranes, Mt. Fuji, a red snapper, and the Shinto emblems of the torii (ceromonial arch) and two rocks joined by a shimenawa (sacred rope).

Detail

No biographical details, but the artist Mori Seikaku specialises in animal and flower scroll paintings. He signs his work the traditional way, with the characters for his given (brush) name, Seikaku (lit. 'nest of the crane') and a seal of the same.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 75 x 50 cm (30" x 20")
Code: E11219 (11-219 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

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Seven lucky gods and the zodiac animals
© Ryutei

Seven lucky gods and the zodiac animals (Ryutei)

The seven gods of good fortune sit surrounded not only by the usual collection of treasure, but also by a large dragon and all the other Chinese zodiac animals, with a red Fuji in the background for good measure.

Ryutei is almost certainly a brushname, but absolutely no other details of the artist are available...

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 75 x 50 cm (30" x 20")
Code: E11391 (11-391 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

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Seven gods and twenty virtues
© Epoch

Seven gods and twenty virtues

The Seven Lucky Gods always bring a promise of worldly wealth, and to make sure of this in this picture they have enlisted the help of the fortune-beckoning cat (maneki-neko), a Daruma, and all the other lucky symbols you can think of, from a red Mount Fuji to the little turtle in the foreground...

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 1000 pieces; 75 x 50 cm (30" x 20")
Code: E11413 (11-413 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

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954 pieces

Seven lucky gods
© Sasagawa Kazuya

Seven lucky gods (Kazuya)

The Seven Lucky Gods (Shichi-fuku-jin) are an assemblage of deities from all across Asia, who are invariably seen as bringers of treasure. They do look a merry lot!

From left to right (same numbers as the key on the box), they are:

  1. Bishamonten, Indian god of war and treasure
  2. Fukurokuju, Chinese god of wisdom
  3. Benzaiten, Indian goddess of the arts
  4. Jurojin, Chinese god of longevity
  5. Hotei, Chinese god of happiness
  6. Daikokuten, Indian (Mahakala) god of five cereals
  7. Ebisu, Japanese god of commerce

Mark Schumacher's page has lots more on the Seven Lucky Gods

Born in Tokyo in 1930, Sasagawa Kazuya is a traditional artist with a particular affection for the jovial Seven Gods, it seems. Kazuya is his given name, with which he signs and seals his pictures, in the usual way.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 954 pieces; 102 x 34 cm (40" x 13")
Code: E09001 (09-001 on box)
Retail price ¥3000

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420 pieces

Seven lucky gods
© Mori Seikaku

Seven lucky gods (Seikaku)

The seven lucky gods in a jolly mood, surrounded by the usual treasure and other auspicious items.

Left to right: Bishamonten, Indian god of war and treasure - Jurojin, Chinese god of longevity - Daikokuten, Indian god (Mahakala) of five cereals - Benzaiten, Indian goddess of the arts - Fukurokuju, Chinese god of wisdom - Hotei, Chinese god of happiness - Ebisu, Japanese god of commerce. An eclectic group...

No biographical details, but the artist Mori Seikaku specialises in animal and flower scroll paintings. He signs his work the traditional way, with the characters for his given (brush) name, Seikaku (lit. 'nest of the crane') and a seal of the same.

* This puzzle has smaller pieces than the standard size.

Permanently unavailable
An Epoch puzzle: 420 pieces; 52 x 18 cm (20" x 7")
Code: E52113 (52-113 on box)
Retail price ¥1800

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